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Restrictions & Sanctions

New Zealand Asian Gypsy Moth Regulations

Current AGM regulations effective 1 February 2018

MPI has issued new Craft risk management standard (CRMS) and its guidance for vessels where the new standard will apply with effect from 1 February 2018.

This new standard includes a new requirement for vessels that have been to risk areas in Table I during the risk period or flight season in the 12 months before entering New Zealand waters. 

For members' information, the CRMS sets out MPI’s minimum requirements so that operators and persons in charge of vessels can understand in what manner they can prevent the introduction of above waters risk goods and minimise entry and arrival delays and costs. The CRMS requires the operator, or person in charge, of any vessel that enters New Zealand to take all reasonable and practicable steps to make sure that the vessel is "free of regulated pests and substantially free of biosecurity contamination".

The CRMS guidance is a quick guide for these vessel operators or person in charge of vessels to enable vessels's entry into New Zealand and subsequent arrival at a port to meet New Zealand's biosecurity requirements within minimal expense and time.

From 1 February 2018:

  • these vessels will require a certificate of freedom from an inspection body recognised by MPI. See section on "Introduction to Asian Gypsy moth" for the list.
  • if they don't have a certificate of freedom, the vessel will be inspected for Asian gypsy moths by an recognised inspection body as per above.  

Table 1.  Risk Areas and Specified Risk Periods 

(Vessels have risk of AGM if, in the last 12 months, visited during corresponding risk period)

Country  Risk Area Specified Risk Period
Russian Far East South of 60o North and west of 147o longitude (excluding those ports on the Kamchatka Peninsula) 1 July to 30 September
China North of latitude of 31o 15' N 1 June to 30 September
Republic of Korea In all areas 1 June to 30 September
Japan -  Northern In prefectures of Hokkaido, Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima 1 July to 30 September
Japan - Western In prefectures of Akita, Yamagata, Niigata, Toyama, Ishikawa 25 June to 15 September
Japan - Eastern In prefectures of Fukui, Ibaraki, Chiba, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Shizuoka, Aichi, Mie 20 June to 20  August
Japan - Southern In prefectures of Wakayama, Osaka, Kyoto, Hyogo, Tottori, Shimane, Okayama, Hiroshima, Yamaguchi, Kagawa, Tokushima, Ehime, Kochi, Fukuoka, Oita, Saga, Nagasaki, Miyazaki, Kumamoto, Kagoshima 1 June to 10 August
Japan - Far Southern In prefecture of Okinawa 25 May to 30 June

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Regulations

Joint-measures by Australia and New Zealand to keep Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs ( BMSBs) out. 

There has been an increasing widespread of the BMSBs throughout Europe and North America. In response to that and to keep these bugs out of their countries, New Zealand and Australia have come together to tighten up their measures to ensure that seasonal measures in place are consistent whenever possible to make compliance easier for vessels carrying cargoes to these countries. 

For the 2019/20 BMSB risk season, this will include the following:

  • Introduction of a joint ‘Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme’. A list of approved treatment providers is jointly maintained by New Zealand’s Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and the Department of Agriculture in Australia and published on both websites.
  • Alignment of treatment options. While the three treatment options, heat treatment, methyl bromide fumigation and sulfuryl fluoride fumigation, remain the same, it is important to note that some treatment application rates have changed.

Note also that the list of targeted list of countries having BMSBs has increased for both countries to 33 countries now.  

Australian Brown marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSBs) requirements

BMSBs pose a high biosecurity risk to Australia. This is an invasive pest, native to Asia, and is highly capable of hitchhiking, highly mobile in nature and lack of effective lures. They can severely impact the Australian agricultural industries as well as a nuisance pest to homes, vehicles and factories, seeking shelter in these areas over the winter. They are more frequently found on goods arriving in Australia between September and April, coinciding with the late autumn and winter seasons in the northern hemisphere. 

Due to the high risks posed by BMSBs, the Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR) has introduced seasonal measures to manage these risks. For the 2019-20 BMSB risk season, heightened biosecurity measures will apply to:

1) certain goods manufactured in, or shipped from target risk countries, and/or
2) vessels that berth at, load or tranship from target risk countries

from 1 September 2019 and that arrive in Australian territory by 31 May 2020 (inclusive).These seasonal measures will apply between 1 September 2019 and 31 May 2020; both dates inclusive.

Goods shipped between 1 September and 30 April need to be treated, and will be referred for intervention if they arrive by 31 May 2020.

For goods that are shipped prior to 30 April and arrive after 31 May, they may be subject to intervention as required.

Vessels

Heightened surveillance will apply to all roll-on/roll-off (ro-ro) vessels. When they berth at, load or tranship in target risk countries from 1 September 2019 and that arrive in Australian territory by 31 May 2020 (inclusive) will be required to: 

  • conduct self-inspections and respond specific questions as part of the pre-arrival reporting requirements, and
  • undergo a mandatory seasonal pest inspection on arrival in Australia.

Vessel Seasonal Pest Scheme

In response to detections and challenges in managing on board infestations during the 2018-19 season, a Vessel Seasonal Pest Scheme (VSPS) will be introduced for the 2019-20 risk season as an alternative vessel clearance pathway for ro-ro vessels.

Only ro-ro vessels that are eligible for the ‘Vessel Seasonal Pest Scheme’ and have detected no insects on board will be exempted from the mandatory seasonal pest inspection. Note that RoRo vessels will only be exempt from mandatory seasonal pest inspections when the can demonstrate that all cargo has:

  • Been treated by a BMSB approved method, or
  • Is covered by an approved safeguarding agreement, or
  • Complies with New, Unused and Not Field Tested criteria,
    And
  • No insects have been detected on board.

DAWR will continue to perform inspections on vessels for other biosecurity reasons unrelated to BMSB. The nature of these inspections will vary based on the particular biosecurity risk being managed.

DAWR will work with selected shipping lines to trial the VSPS. For further information on the VSPS and 2019-20 BMSB seasonal measures for vessels visit the 2019-20 BMSB Vessels webpage.

Target risk countries 

Any target high risk or target risk goods manufactured in, or shipped from these countries are subject to the BMSB seasonal measures.  Any vessel that that berths at, load or tranships from these countries are also subject to BMSB seasonal measures:

  • Albania
  • Andorra
  • Armenia
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Belgium
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • Croatia
  • Czech Republic
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Italy
  • Kosovo
  • Liechtenstein
  • Luxembourg
  • Macedonia
  • Montenegro
  • Netherlands
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Serbia
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Switzerland
  • Spain
  • Turkey
  • United States of America
  • Japan (heightened vessel surveillance will be the only measure applied).

Target high risk or target risk goods 

Some goods manufactured in, or shipped from the target risk countries as sea cargo have been identified as target high risk or target risk goods. To view the list as well as how these goods should be subject to BMSB treatments, please click on this DAWR link here.  

Throughout the season, the measures based on detections of BMSB and the risk pathways would be continuously reviewed.

New Zealand BMSB requirements

On 22nd July 2019, revised standards for "Import Health Standard for Vehicles, Machinery and Parts" and "Import Health standard for Sea Containers from all Countries"  were released by the New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries  (MPI). 

For BMST requirements in New Zealand, please to the Biosecurity New Zealand website managed by MPI. Also see ships arriving and hitchhiker pests. The new requirements apply with effect from 1 September 2019 to 30 April 2020. 

See also "Stink bug warning to importers" from MPI dates 1 August 2019. 

Chilean BMSB requirements

Servicio Agricola y Ganadero (SAG) Resolution No. 971/2018 (Spanish only), requiring fumigation of goods from United States to Chile. This resolution was further amended in 2019 ( No. 5607/2019) to include measures applicable for used vehicles and vehicle parts.  

Members operating ships to Australia, New Zealand and Chile are urged to familiarise themselves of the above BMSB requirements and compliance and for translation to get local agents to arrange accordingly. 

 

Pest Alert – Brown Marmorated Stink Bug – Vessels Beware!

Australian Brown marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSBs) requirements

BMSBs pose a high biosecurity risk to Australia. This is an invasive pest, native to Asia, and is highly capable of hitchhiking, highly mobile in nature and lack of effective lures. They can severely impact the Australian agricultural industries as well as a nuisance pest to homes, vehicles and factories, seeking shelter in these areas over the winter. They are more frequently found on goods arriving in Australia between September and April, coinciding with the late autumn and winter seasons in the northern hemisphere. 

Due to the high risks posed by BMSBs, the Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR) has introduced seasonal measures to manage these risks. These seasonal measures will apply between 1 September 2018 and 30 April 2019; both dates inclusive.

Vessels

Heightened surveillance on all roll-on/roll-off (ro-ro) and general cargo vessels through additional pre-arrival reporting with a BMSB questionnaire and daily checks conducted by vessel masters.

Target risk countries 

Any target high risk or target risk goods manufactured in, or shipped from these countries are subject to the BMSB seasonal measures.  Any vessel that tranships or loads goods from these countries are also subject to heightened vessel surveillance:

  • United States of America
  • Italy
  • Germany
  • France
  • Russia
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Romania
  • Georgia
  • Japan (heightened vessel surveillance will be the only measure applied).

Target high risk or target risk goods 

Some goods manufactured in, or shipped from the target risk countries as sea cargo have been identified as target high risk or target risk goods. To view the list as well as how these goods should be subject to BMSB treatments, please click on this DAWR link here 

Throughout the season, the measures based on detections of BMSB and the risk pathways would be continuously reviewed.

New Zealand BMSB requirements

For BMST requirements in New Zealand, please to the Biosecurity New Zealand website

Chilean BMSB requirements

Servicio Agricola y Ganadero (SAG) Resolution No. 971/2018 (Spanish only)

Members operating ships to Australia, New Zealand and Chile are urged to familiarise themselves of the above BMSB requirements and compliance.

 

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug - new season new rules

The new season for BMSBs bugs has started in September and with that, a whole new string of measures has been implemented jointly by New Zealand and Australia to stem the tide of these bugs coming into their countries. For the 2019/2020 season, these measures include: 

  • Introduction of a joint ‘Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme’. A list of approved treatment providers is jointly maintained by New Zealand’s Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and the Department of Agriculture in Australia and published on both websites.
  • Alignment of treatment options. While the three treatment options, heat treatment, methyl bromide fumigation and sulfuryl fluoride fumigation, remain the same, it is important to note that some treatment application rates have changed.

Due to the rapid spread of these BMSBs in Europe and North America, the list of countries targetted for having BMSBs has now grown to 33 countries for New Zealand and Australia. 

New Zealand's MPI  has released new versions of their "Import Health Standard for Vehicles, Machinery and Parts" and the " Import Health Standard for Sea Containers from all countries" which entered into force on 22 July and 19 July 2019 respectively. These revised standards impose various requirements for certain goods as well as specific ones for sea containers coming from Italy  and used vehicles from Japan.   

MPI has also issued a "stick bug warning to importers" including shippers who may be unaware of these new rules to take the necessary action required. 

The Chilean Agriculture and Livestock Service has also applied similar measures via their amended resolution (No.5607/2019) to No. 971/2018,  both of which are unfortunately in Spanish. 

To see all the above requirements, our section on "Asian Gypsy Moth & phytosanitary restrictions/Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Regulations" has all the details. 

BIMCO Recommendations

Members operating ships heading for Australia, New Zealand and Chile should ensure that the above BMSB seasonal measures are complied with in order to avoid ships being turned away from their territorial waters, notwithstanding that the responsibility of ensuring the cargo is ¨'clean' lies with the importers. 

New Zealand gets tough on stink bug ships!

A large car truck carrier was ordered to leave New Zealand (NZ) after biosecurity officers found 3 live and 39 dead brown marmorated stink bugs and 69 other dead regulated stink bugs on board shortly after arriving in Auckland. The vessel, which was carrying a range of vehicles from Europe and the United States, left and would have to be treated offshore. If it is permitted to return, it will undergo another round of intensive inspection prior to discharging. 

Stink bugs are a serious pest and can pose a real threat to the NZ's agriculture and horticulture industries as well as being a social nuisance. Hence NZ biosecurity officers are enforcing strict requirements to ensure that these pests stop at the border before getting into NZ.

In February, NZ Biosecurity authorities turned around 4 bulk carriers arriving from Japan due to stink bug contamination, but the large car truck carrier was the first ordered to leave New Zealand after the commencement of the 2018/19 stink bug season in September.. 

Minister for Primary Industries (MPI), the lead agency for bioscecurity enforcement and providing inspectors at the border for inspection, have added additional requirements,for example, uncontainerised vehicles and machinery to be assessed as compliant before they are allowed to be discharged. MPI no longer directs contaminated ships to undergo fogging with insecticide in NZ.  

For more details, please go to "Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Regulations" on our website.

Bunker prices: sourced from www.mabux.com

Current bunker prices Last Updated: 16:33 (GMT) - 30 May 2020

PORTS 380cSt 180cSt VLS FO MGO LS
Rotterdam 185 ↓ (-5) 230 → (+0) 265 ↓ (-1)
Singapore 199 ↓ (-2) 267 ↓ (-10) 295 ↓ (-1)
Fujairah 182 ↓ (-13) 305 ↑ (+10) 365 ↓ (-15)
Copenhagen 193 → (+0) 248 ↓ (-5) 293 ↓ (-5)
Gothenburg 190 → (+0) 245 ↓ (-5) 290 ↓ (-5)
St. Petersburg 155 ↓ (-5) 220 → (+0) 259 ↓ (-1)
Tallinn 201 ↓ (-2) 253 ↑ (+10) 330 ↑ (+5)
Gibraltar 222 ↑ (+2) 275 ↓ (-6) 317 ↓ (-3)
Pireaus 227 ↓ (-3) 277 ↑ (+2) 287 ↓ (-13)
Istanbul 260 ↓ (-5) 300 ↓ (-15)
Houston 195 ↑ (+3) 247 ↑ (+2) 293 ↑ (+1)
Panama Canal 247 ↑ (+2) 268 ↑ (+3) 320 ↓ (-5)
Santos 237 ↓ (-12) 237 ↓ (-12) 402 ↓ (-2)
Buenos Aires 305 → (+0) 480 → (+0)
Hamburg 180 ↓ (-5) 245 ↑ (+5) 280 ↓ (-10)
Riga 197 ↓ (-5) 241 → (+0) 325 ↓ (-4)
Suape(XB)
Antwerpen 187 ↓ (-5) 232 → (+0) 267 ↓ (-1)
New York 203 ↓ (-2) 278 ↓ (-8) 317 ↓ (-6)
Philadelphia 206 ↓ (-2) 283 ↓ (-8) 322 ↓ (-6)
Hong Kong 225 ↓ (-6) 278 ↓ (-14) 297 ↓ (-10)
Genoa 215 ↑ (+10) 270 ↓ (-11) 341 → (+0)
Augusta 209 ↓ (-4) 287 ↑ (+9) 342 ↑ (+4)
Rio de Janeiro 262 ↓ (-12) 262 ↓ (-12) 372 ↓ (-2)
Bremerhaven 177 ↓ (-5) 260 ↑ (+5) 305 ↓ (-10)
Paranagua 267 ↓ (-12) 267 ↓ (-12) 435 ↓ (-2)
Rio Grande 267 ↓ (-12) 267 ↓ (-12) 436 ↓ (-2)
Recife
Salvador 275 ↓ (-12) 275 ↓ (-12) 417 ↓ (-2)
Fortaleza 253 ↓ (-12) 253 ↓ (-12) 425 ↓ (-2)
Fremantle 460 ↑ (+20) 480 → (+0)
Belem 296 ↓ (-12) 296 ↓ (-12) 449 ↓ (-2)
Tubarao 262 ↓ (-12) 262 ↓ (-12) 425 ↓ (-2)
Curacao 539 → (+0) 582 → (+0)
New Orleans 218 ↓ (-9) 255 ↓ (-15) 287 ↓ (-3)
Manaus 276 ↓ (-12) 276 ↓ (-12) 413 ↓ (-2)
Niteroi 262 ↓ (-12) 262 ↓ (-12) 372 ↓ (-2)
Praia Mole 262 ↓ (-12) 262 ↓ (-12) 425 ↓ (-2)
Suape(XP)
Vila do Conde 296 ↓ (-12) 296 ↓ (-12) 449 ↓ (-2)
Vitoria 262 ↓ (-12) 262 ↓ (-12) 425 ↓ (-2)
Itaqui (XP) 299 ↓ (-12) 299 ↓ (-12) 443 ↓ (-2)
Miami 247 ↑ (+3) 352 ↑ (+1)

Maximum Size

Dry Cargo
Port Chalmers
Dry Cargo
Dunedin
Tanker
Dunedin Only
Max. LOA
290.0 m
190.0 m
190.0 m
Max. beam
No restrictions
32.5 m
32.5 m
Max. draft
11.0 m LW
12.5 m HW
6.5 m LW
8.0 m HW
6.5 m LW
8.0 m
12.5 HW
Max. DWT
No restrictions

Vessels over 190.0 LOA may be handled. Up to Marine Services Manager's approval.